Agnostic Front, Sick of It All, and Crown of Thornz play Hell at the Masquerade on Sunday, May 22

Agnostic Front

Agnostic Front, Sick Of It All, and Crown of Thornz play in Hell at the Masquerade on Sun., May 22. $27.50 (advance). 7 p.m. (doors).

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Terror, Kublai Khan TX, and Pain of Truth play The Earl on Wed., May 25

Terror

Los Angeles’ straightedge-hardcore luminaries Terror are on the road again, this time celebrating 20 years of paint-peeling guitars, lightning-fast rhythms, and fierce and empowering vocal assaults. For this round of shows the group will pull out a few of their brutal classics while showcasing a set of newer numbers from their eighth album, Pain Into Power (Pure Noise Records), which was produced by the Terror’s co-founder member and former guitar player, Todd Jones.

Sherman, TX metalcore outfit Kublai Khan TX plays the middle slot supporting a new release of their own, titled Lowest Form of Animal (Rise Records).

Long Island hardcore outfit Pain of Truth, fronted by vocalist Michael Smith (Hangman, Victory Garden), sets the night in motion.

$27 (adv). $30 (Doors). Wed., May 25 at The Earl.

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Circle Jerks, 7 Seconds, and Negative Approach play the Masquerade July 22

Circle Jerks photo by Atiba Jefferson


Southern California hardcore icons the Circle Jerks are on the road again, celebrating the 40th anniversaries of their first two albums, Group Sex and Wild In the Streets, both recently reissued by Trust Records Company.

The show also marks the Circle Jerks’ first show in Atlanta since they played the Masquerade in December of 2006. Were you at that show?

For this tour, drummer Joey Castillo (Danzig, QOTSA, BL’AST!, the Bronx, and more) joins the classic lineup, featuring bass player Zander Schloss, guitar player Greg Hetson, and frontman Keith Morris.

Trust Records also recently reissued 7 Seconds’ 1984 debut LP, The Crew. Both 7 Seconds and Negative Approach (!!!) fill out the bill in Heaven at the Masquerade. Friday, July 22. $32.50 (adv). 7 p.m. (doors).

Photo courtesy 7 Seconds


Negative Approach photo by Chad Radford


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High Key Disco feat. Treasure Fingers & Jeremy Avalon every Tuesday night at MJQ

Jeremy Avalon (left) and Treasure Fingers. Photo by Sao Hennyshot

High Key Disco is a weekly residency featuring Treasure Fingers and Jeremy Avalon—two of Atlanta’s premier DJs spinning electronic music, funk, and disco in the cafe at MJQ. $5. Every Tuesday night from 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

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Gallery 992 Improv. Jam, every Sunday evening

Photo by Chad Radford

Gallery 992‘s Sunday night free improv jams are back!

For the time being, every Sunday evening from 6-10 p.m., the weekly jam has moved just a few doors down to the lot near the corner of Ralph David Abernathy Blvd. and Peeples Street, where there’s plenty of space to get spaced out. Under the direction of alto saxophone player Quinn Mason and percussionist Dallas Dawson, an assemblage of the city’s finest players lock into each other for a massive and seemingly telepathic group improv blast before opening up the stage. They’ll play for as long as the law allows—the noise ordinance kicks in at 10 p.m.

In this new, temporary outdoor setting, the weekly jam has taken on a whole new vibe, summoning a rejuvenated sense of community spirit in the West End. These performances are about catharsis, purgation, and finding mental and spiritual balance in the shadow of a world in turmoil.

Witnessing so much energy, and engaging with live music on such visceral and cerebral levels, after so many months spent in lock down is a powerful and emotionally riveting experience that’s not to be taken lightly—you need it more than you know.

Bring a lawn chair—it’s outside, but wearing a mask and maintaining that six-feet of social distance makes everyone feel a safer, and little more comfortable.