Mastodon unveils new video for ‘Pushing the Tides’


Before the weekend gets underway, be advised that hometown metal titan Mastodon has rolled out a new video for the song “Pushing the Tides.”

It’s the first look and listen to the upcoming ninth album, Hushed and Grim, out October 29 via Reprise Records, just in time for Halloween. It’s a scorcher, too—a new number with a touch of that old Leviathan vibe right out of the gate.

The album was produced by David Bottrill (Peter Gabriel, Rush, Tool) and features a guest appearance by Soundgarden guitarist Kim Thayil. More info coming soon. In the meantime, press play and click the album cover below, courtesy of Paul Romano (Remission, Leviathan, Call of the Mastodon, Blood Mountain, Crack The Skye), for pre-order info.

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New Music: Takénobu’s ‘Got to Get By’

Nick Ogawa (left) and Kathryn Koch. Photo by Steve West

For your weekend listening stack, Takénobu returns with a new song titled “Got to Get By.”

This latest release is the third single from the upcoming self-released album, Always Leave a Note, due out September 3.

Here, singer and cellist Nick Ogawa and wife, singer and violin player Kathryn Koch, strike a balance between their music’s dramatic pop inflections and the sense of lingering unease that came with life amid a global pandemic. Naturally, the title serves as a mantra of endurance and catharsis. The strength of their songwriting and their earnest delivery also show off new depth and direction, offering a hint at the direction of the new album.

Press play below.

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Tears For the Dying evokes shocking, B-horror vibes with new single, ‘Mortuary’

Tears For the Dying‘s singer and multi-instrumentalist Adria Stembridge is living in Athens these days, methodically working with two new musicians—bass player Zakki Kartoffel and guitar player Morgona Widow—to solidify a new lineup. 

The group’s latest single, “Mortuary,” has been making the rounds since May. Stembridge tracked the single by herself earlier this year, but with lyrics such as “Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, purified flesh chase you tonight. No eyes to see, just slash and dine, screams on dead ears, kill to survive! Screaming bodies in the mortuary. Screaming bodies in the laboratory,” it’s no less vexing in its creepy and death-afflicted goth-punk and metal imagery.

“I loved the main guitar riff but wanted to add an extra strings track that subtly alludes to the B-horror movie soundtrack technique of shocking the audience with a sharp musical stroke,” Stembridge says. “I feel like everyone is zombied out, given the huge number of zombie movies and shows over the past decade or so, but I haven’t heard many modern goth/deathrock bands explore the vibe in music.”

Stembridge worked with legendary March Violets guitarist-turned producer Tom Ashton (Vision Video, Entertainment, Hip To Death) at Subvon Studio in Athens to record multiple versions of “Mortuary.” One is a raw, guitars-only mix, and a third version is synths-only. Keep an eye out for different versions of the song to appear later this summer.

With the new lineup in place, Stembridge, who has handled much of the guitar and bass playing duties in the group, will now focus mainly on guitar and voice.

A new album is also in the works.

In the meantime, the group’s first show back from the pandemic is Fri., Aug. 13, at Flicker Bar in Athens. Tears for the Dying will also appear at the forthcoming VOTH (vegan goth food + dark music festival) on Oct. 15.

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Neon Christ enlist their kids to play younger versions of themselves in a new video for their classic theme song

Neon Christ playing the Little 5 Points Fest, October 6, 1984 (on Seminole Ave. behind what is now Junkman’s Daughter). Photo by Chuck Gill.

Here’s a blast from the past to keep to your PMA going strong. The members of Neon Christ, Atlanta’s staple hardcore outfit circa 1984 through ‘86—vocalist Randy DuTeau, guitar player William DuVall, bass player Danny Lankford, and drummer Jimmy Demer—tapped their kids to play the younger versions of themselves in a new video for the group’s classic theme song.

As Demer explains, “I had this idea that we should make a video for the song ‘Parental Suppression,’ and have our kids play us. I brought it to the rest of the guys, and everyone was into the idea, but then nothing happened. Later, William came to me and said ‘hey, let’s do this, but for ‘Neon Christ’ instead.”

The song “Neon Christ” originally appeared on the group’s 10-song Parental Suppression 7-inch EP. And, after all, it is one of the catchiest songs on the record.

When Neon Christ was a functioning band, DuVall performed using his childhood nickname Kip. Since 2006, DuVall has sung and played guitar with the band Alice in Chains. In 2019, he released an album of solo acoustic songs, titled One Alone via his DVL Records imprint.

On the audio side, DuVall took Neon Christ’s original tapes to Nashville-based studio Welcome to 1979 to be remastered for an upcoming DVL/Southern Lord discography LP, titled 1984. The record compiles all of the material from Neon Christ’s Parental Suppression EP and the A Seven Inch Two Times double 7-inch originally released in 1990, and is set to arrive June 12—Record Store Day 2021.

In the meantime, check out the video for “Neon Christ,” directed by Atlanta-based filmmaker Nick Rosendorf.

Stay tuned for more Neon Christ news coming soon!

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Lynx Deluxe’s ‘Jungleland’ EP reckons with the self, the spirit, and Southern identity

JUNGLELAND: Original artwork by Paul Frick. Graphic art by Willem Kaiser

There’s a jungle inside the mind of singer and guitar player Andy Browne, and it’s teeming with life. The five songs that make up Lynx Deluxe’s Jungleland EP take shape as an enigmatic reckoning of the self, the spirit, and Southern identity. Heavy rhythms, subtle brass filigree, and percolating keys are pushed forward by arty rock leanings powered by enough muscle and confidence to uphold the group’s ambitions.

Opening number “Jane Goodall” puts a face on part of the music’s veiled metaphors, beginning with the sounds of a screaming chimpanzee in an ecstatic state. The closing song, “Steppin’ On Gold,” brings an even deeper allegory—steeped in the imagery of The Wizard Of Oz—to an intriguing point. Along the way, the musical journey from inner chaos to contentment reveals itself to be an exercise in catharsis, driven by evocative lyrical imagery and compositions that are as thick as English Ivy.

“Jane Goodall,” “The Struggle,” and “Mercy” are bound by a barreling spaciousness and momentum that falls into place with musical unity. Browne’s strained yet soaring and impressionistic voice is accentuated by the ambiance created by bass player Lucy Theodora, drummer Brad Mattson, keyboard player Billy Fields, and guitarist Greg Di Gesu weaving an intense musical web that matches the power of lyrics such as “It’s a struggle to break the chains  / It’s a struggle to take the blame / It’s a struggle to let it go / To sit like Buddha in a perfect flow” in “The Struggle.”

Browne’s songwriting resonates with a deeply buried and universally shared note that rings out in all of our minds. In “Saints” and “Steppin’ On Gold,” that note shifts to bolster the uplifting and undeniably catchy essence of each number as they rise out of some vast and mysterious part of the imagination, giving rise to a sense of calmness that’s achieved equally through Browne’s words and the group’s long, interweaving instrumental chemistry. This alone makes Jungleland an engaging chapter for Browne, whose songwriting first left a mark in the mid ‘80s while he fronted Atlanta’s Southern post-punk rockers the Nightporters, a band that also featured bass player Tim Nielsen and drummer Paul Lenz of Drivin N Cryin. In more recent years, his songs fronting the Andy Browne Troupe have revealed themselves to be stepping stones leading to the baroque and Southern alternative rock and pop that Lynx Deluxe brings to life. Jungleland is a true band effort without allegiance to the past, present, or the future. The songs are open-hearted, complete, and flourishing with redemptive fodder for the imagination that’s mysteriously timeless.

Lynx Deluxe plays the Roxy with Drivin N Cryin on Saturday, June 19. $28-$69. 8 p.m.

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Disturbios give Subsonics’ ‘See Thru Rhonda’ an avant-garde makeover

DISTURBIOS: Matt (left) and Rocío Verta-Ray.

The latest single and video released from Disturbios’ self-titled debut album gives the Subsonics’ jangle-punk rocker “See Thru Rhonda” a minimal synth and dadaesque makeover.

The duo at the center of Disturbios, Matt and Rocío Verta-Ray, describe the song as: “Trailer park hijinks. A loaded pistol, a no-good boyfriend but Rhonda takes the consequences.”

In 1995, Matt produced the Subsonics’ classic third LP Everything Is Falling Apart—where “See Thru Rhonda” originally appeared—at N.Y. Hed Studio in New York City. Since then, he’s produced most of their albums including their latest offering, 2018’s Flesh Colored Paint.

The studio is a staple of the city’s punk and rock ‘n’ roll scene, and has turned out albums by everyone from Suicide’s Alan Vega and Ronnie Spector of the Ronettes to Elliott Smith and Jon Spencer Blues Explosion—Matt played in Heavy Trash with Jon Spencer, Speedball Baby, Madder Rose, and more. Both Matt and Rocío work on albums together at N.Y. Hed.

Disturbios is an intriguing departure from any of the aforementioned names. Each song on the new album is tied together in a wash of surf, yeye, new wave, and experimental pop inflections. “Surf Gnossienne,” their take on French composer Erik Satie’s “Gnossienne no. 1,” plunges the song’s rhythms into the depths of psychedelic and avant-garde mysticism.

“Jesus I was Evil” captures the chilling insolence, and the alluring danger of a band that hones a classic New York City proto-punk vibe, while keeping its gaze fixed on a saturated future.

Their reductionist sound paired with the writhing avant-garde imagery of the video reveals wholly new and mysterious dimensions hidden within the Subsonics’ classic.

The album is out May 21 via Midnight Cruiser Records.


Check out the first single and video for the album’s first single, “Starr,” which premiered at The Big Takover in April.

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Sad Fish tell a tale of trickery and human sacrifice with ‘Deusa’

Nearly four years have gone by since Sad Fish released the Take the Bait cassette EP (Godless America) in November of 2017. Much has changed since then.

With their latest single, titled “Deusa,” Sad Fish awakens from its long slumber wielding a more considered Brazilian pop sound, crafted by a new lineup that eschews the eccentricities of the group’s beginnings.

What began as singer, guitar and keyboard player, and main songwriter Arthur Cabral’s project has become a full band, as drummer, percussionist and engineer Lyle Baldes, and bass player Gracie Joo have settled in alongside Cabral and long standing drummer Emma Rubenstein. With the passage of time, and developing chemistry with a dedicated bass player and second percussionist, Sad Fish has learned how to articulate what the group’s previous concoctions of lo-fi Tropicália and psychedelic pop only hinted at—albeit sung entirely in Portuguese.

Cabral hails from Goiânia, Brazil. His innate musical inflections are an indelible part of Sad Fish’s sound, vision, and personality. Experimental time signatures, though, and a genuinely peculiar  sense of humor have long been a part of the group’s identity as well. With “Deusa,” these elements are still there, but they’re employed with subtlety as the group remains focused on drawing out rhythms, melody, and a more sophisticated musical experience (a la Sue Jorge, Caetano Veloso, and Os Mutantes).

The video, directed by Bill Guzik, and starring Eliana Heiser, Bishop Harry, and Pete Though, brings the group’s surreal and cinematic inclinations to life with a noirish tale of trickery and human sacrifice.

“Deusa” is the first single from an as yet untitled album that’s due out this Fall—Sad Fish’s first proper full-length.

Sad Fish is playing a live-streaming set of unreleased songs from the new album at Casa Nova on Monday, April 19. Tune in via Facebook, and keep your eyes peeled for more details coming soon.

Sad Fish are (from left to right) Lyle Baldes, Arthur Cabral, Emma Rubenstein, and Gracie Joo.
Photo by Klaudia Wski.

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Antagonizers ATL: Street punk KINGS!

Antagonizers ATL. Photo by Todd Huber


One album later and Antagonizers ATL have ascended from Working Class Street Punk(s) into KINGS!

From the moment the bounding chorus of opening number “Worries” takes hold, a major-chord rock ‘n’ roll stride—carried in the organ and barreling rhythms—distills decades of boot-stomping, fist-pumping sing-alongs, and brotherly hugs into a sophomore album that’s a street punk classic-on-arrival. With KINGS (Pirates Press Records), the group keeps one foot planted firmly in the traditions of Fred Perry Polo shirts and Oxblood Docs. But singer and frontman Bohdan Zacharyj, singer and lead guitarist Richard Henderson, keyboard player Billy Fields, singer and rhythm guitarist Eric Antell, singer and bass player Wynn Pettitt, and drummer Don Tonic push themselves to rise above garden variety oi to become a great rock ‘n’ roll band, punk or no punk.


Part of the group’s strength lies in its snarling three-guitar blitz. But at the core, each song is bursting with positive energy, culminating in an earnest and deeply personal celebration of do-it-yourself pride and allegiance to a moral code that transcends everything else.

“Black Clouds,” the album’s first single, is where Antagonizers ATL’s indomitable spirit and its message shine brightest: Build strength through self-reliance, watch your friends’ backs, and always maintain a PMA (positive mental attitude) no matter what obstacles life throws in your path.


Matt Henson of Tacoma, Washington’s NOi!SE joins in the chant with the lyrics: “Keep on swingin’ and I’m missin,’ too. At least I’m swingin,’ and not cryin’ the blues. I’d rather fail than not try. Give my all ’till the day I die.”

These words project a stylish clubhouse rule to leave your complaints at the door. This record is all about finding strength and integrity through endurance, in a time when knee-jerk hostility is the order of the day. In 2021, this whole dynamic is, once again, the frontier of punk and hardcore, and it’s a thread that ties together songs such as “Trouble,” “Problems” (featuring Chris Doherty of Gang Green), “Us Against the World,” and the album’s title track. … And For all intents and purposes, Antagonizers ATL might just have a hit on their hands with “Hold On Hold Strong.” Here, Monty Neysmith of British ska/reggae legends Symarip adds a touch of his signature Skinhead Moonstomping inflections for what is without a doubt a modern hardcore anthem. With each song, the group remains fast, furious, and proud, while leavening these qualities with genuinely powerful songwriting. Every step of the way Zacharyj, Henderson, and Pettitt reach deep, trading lyrics that transcend politics and expectations with a message of true positivity, delivered in 10 songs of working class punk and rock ‘n’ roll par excellence.


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New Loony tune: ‘Dead Heat’ (practice tape)


In January of 2020, Loony took the stage at 529 to play Radfest with Purkinje Shift and W8ing4UFOs—my birthday party. It was a Sunday afternoon “matinee” show that ended up going well into the night. Who knew we were so close to losing live music for much of the coming year?

A week before the show, singer Anela DeVille, bass player Silas Fiction, guitarist Scott Price, and drummer Isaac Makin got together for practice and recorded the “Dead Heat” demo that you see and hear above.

Over the last year, the group’s lineup has paired down to just Fiction and DeVille fleshing out six songs that they hope to release by this summer via Die Slaughterhaus Records. For these six new recordings that are currently in post-production, Price played guitar, and Amos Rifkin of A Rippin’ Production filled in as temporary drummer. While a permanent lineup has yet to take shape, Fiction and DeVille are pressing forward. First up: “Dead Heat.” Although this recording is a rough demo, it’s a solid sneak peek at the group’s full-throttle charge. It’s also an homage to one of Joe Piscopo’s finest/most absurd acting roles, Detective Doug Bigelow in the 1988 action-comedy sci-fi cult sleeper, Dead Heat.

“I had written those riffs, and later that day we watched Dead Heat,” Fiction says. We both loved it!”

LOONY: Silas Fiction (left) and Anela DeVille. Photo by Eric Gessler

Together, Fiction and DeVille penned the lyrics as a summary of the movie. “It’s so ingenious, and it had us laughing so hard,” DeVille says. “We wanted to make it known how badass this movie is. Those who haven’t seen it need to watch it in order to know what we are talking about.”

The music is inspired by So. Cal hardcore/nardcore Thrasher Magazine skate rock aesthetics of the ’80s. It’s music for fans of TSOL, RKL, Agent Orange, Agression, JFA, McRad, Doggy Style, Vision Street Wear, pulling off slappies and smith grinds, and getting awesome. Check out the lyrics below.

Dead heat
Back from the grave
Nothing to do
No one to save

Dead man walking
Cannot be shot down 
Terrorizing 
The entire town

Dead heat
Back from the grave 
Falling apart 
Slimy decay

Infinite lives 
Soul cannot be found
Decomposing 
Time is running out

Dead heat
Back from the grave 
Dying to live
Willing to trade

Time is running out!

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Überchriist returns from a decade of silence with ‘Et Veniens’ EP


A decade has gone by since Überchriist last checked in with their self-titled debut cassette via Fan Death Records. But the black metal duo featuring Colin Mee (vocals, guitar, and bass) and Shane Patrick (drums, keyboard, and vocals ) brings a combined resume to the group that bridges a much broader swath of time and music in Atlanta. Mee is a former member of post-punk institution Deerhunter, indie rockers Hollow Stars, and heavy metal mashers Chopper. Patrick is the former drummer and co-founder of the confrontational noise rock and post-punk outfits HAWKS, Aku You, and Illegal Drugs.

After so much time in the void, Überchriist returns with Et Veniens, a new four-song EP of riffs and growling antagonism that’s both scorched and chilling on a supernatural level.

Photo courtesy Überchriist.

In Latin, Et Veniens, means “The Coming.” Here, the title announces the arrival of a more evolved sound and vision, of which these four songs are only the first glimpse. “Colin and I have spent years writing new batches of songs and giving Überchriist a more mature sound,” Patrick says. “We are coming back to the world, and we plan on releasing more material in the near future.”

The songs for the new EP were recorded by Matt Greenia at Diamond Street Studios in Little 5 Points. Kyle Spence (Harvey Milk, Tom Collins, Dinosaur Jr.) mixed and mastered the material at his studio in Athens. The result of their efforts draws out a feeling that is distinctly more demonic than their previous offering. This singular sound—rest assured, it packs a scolding white-hot fist to your mortal soul—makes Et Veniens an ideal second coming. The new songs, featuring titles such as “Sanctuary Defiled,” “Abysmal Despair,” “Ubernaut,” and “Breaking Ov The Light” expand upon the group’s sonic reach with a foreboding haze of haunted animosity.

A new full-length album is lurking out there somewhere in the inky black ether, as Mee and Patrick are working on new material with Spence. Expect more from Überchriist to arrive by next fall/winter. “This is just the beginning,” Patrick says. “We’re showing the universe that we’re back on the map. It is a sign. The coming.”

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