Upcoming shows

Vision Video: ‘Organized Murder’

Vision Video is back with a new video for “Organized Murder,” taken from the group’s debut album, Inked In Red.

This one ain’t for the faint of heart! “Organized Murder” is the fourth video released by Athens’ gothic rock luminaries, following videos for “Inked In Red,” “Comfort in the Grave,” and “Static Drone.” The song also bears the sharpest teeth when it comes to wrapping the group’s stylized mastery of darkness, light, and melodic hooks around a poignant statement. 

The song opens with a chilling bit of dialogue taken from make-up artist Tom Savini’s reimagining of the classic horror film Night of the Living Dead. Ben, a character played by actor Tony Todd, delivers these particularly chilling lines while coming to terms with the zombie apocalypse that’s unfolding around him: “This is something that nobody has ever heard about, and nobody has ever seen before. This is hell on Earth… This is pure hell on Earth.”

Set to director Erica Strout’s visual accompaniment, “Organized Murder” leaps into action as a fitting metaphor for what the group describes as America’s fetishization of “violence, force, and warfare on behalf of ‘the greater good.’”

A statement released with the video goes on to say that: “This is a representation of my experiences watching systematic violence used on behalf of morally bankrupt political ideologies to meet their ends and economic hegemony by military domination across the third world.”

Press play and let it sink in.

Read the Flagpole Magazine feature story, “Inked in Red: Vision Video Processes War, Trauma and Loss Through Goth Rock.”

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Genki Genki Panic: ‘The Munge’ b/w ‘Gas Human Being No. 1 / the Human Vapor,’ and ‘Moth Mandingo Effect’ 7-inch

Put on your 3-D glasses now.


Genki Genki Panic thrives on the fringes of the ecstatic, honing a musical aesthetic that eviscerates traditional notions of genre, while offering a dizzying array of threads to pull at every turn.

Hailing from the rolling and mystical expanse of terrain that lies between Atlanta, GA and Chattanooga,TN, GGP guitar and keyboard player Chris Moree, bass player Eric Waller, and drummer Chris Campbell’s musical bounds are as limitless as the landscape from whence the group sprouted. Each song draws inspiration from the deepest darkest recesses of pop culture.

It’s all on display in the three songs pressed onto the group’s first vinyl 7-inch — “The Munge” b/w “Gas Human Being No.1 The Human Vapor” and “Moth Mandingo Effect.”

Just a cursory scroll through GGP’s Bandcamp page reveals a deluge of musical excursions in which the group plays more notes in one measure than most technically skilled metal bands on the scene. Elsewhere, GGP mines the sonic palette of video game soundtracks and reassembles them to bear their own deranged adventures.

Layers upon layers of references come together around each new offering: A cover of the Deadly Ones’ “It’s Monster Surfing Time” blends album cover art from the Descendents’ Milo Goes To College with imagery from “Planet of the Apes.”

Ghoulie High Harmony *Director’s Cut is perhaps the greatest Boyz II Men reference that no one has ever caught. Still elsewhere, GGP’s sound and vision is a tangle of not-so-veiled nods to Bad Brains, OutKast, Big Black, Beetlejuice and classic horror film scenes, all tied together with an affinity for spooky vibes and haunted surf and sci-fi sounds.

“The Munge” (dubbed “The Munge Parasito” on the Bandcamp page) saunters in before the nearly three-minute tsunami jam takes over the song. “Gas Human Being No.1 / The Human Vapor” and “Moth Mandingo Effect” push the eerie irreverence beyond the record’s grooves, giving rise to a particularly twisted ambiance. It’s seemingly impossible to avoid being swept up in the group’s high-energy dirges, despite (or maybe because of) their defiantly wide-eyed ways.

Genki Genki Panic plays Hammerhead Fest 9.5 Sat., Nov. 27, at Boggs Social and Supply (outdoor stage) with Paladin, Order of the Owl, the Vaginas, Canopy, Black Candle, and Naw. $15. 4 p.m. (doors). 

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The Hot Place featuring David J: ‘Hell, Highwater, or Sunlight’



Returning with their first new offering since 2019, the Hot Place’s latest single, “Hell, Highwater, or Sunlight” is a supernatural blues number steeped in the dark and folkloric imagery of a metaphorical wild hunt.

The song features David J of Bauhaus and Love and Rockets playing harmonica, illustrating an abstract tale that’s a bit spookier than any of the Hot Place’s previous releases. “Hell, Highwater, or Sunlight” was, however, unveiled on Halloween night, just in time for Samhain to kick off November’s enchanted witching season.

Singer and bass player Lisa King wrote the lyrics for the song in the midst of a sudden and tumultuous thunderstorm that swept over the city on a night before David J was playing a show at Little Tree Art Studios in June of 2017. King recalls the evening: “I was at Leon’s Full Service in Decatur, and the trees were hitting the window in a really spooky way, like skeletons. The moon was out, clouds were moving by fast in the sky. I started writing lyrics to this blues song we had, and I imagined being in the woods.”

David J at Electron Gardens Studio. Photo by Lisa King.

Guitarists Mike Lynn and Jeff Calder flesh out the spectral sound that expands upon the Hot Place’s shadowy psychedelia and spare, alternative rock stylings with the mystical essence of mythology and metaphor. King’s lyrical mysticism drives the eerie folk ballad like a storm swell over Calder’s atmospheric mandolin and Robert Schmid’s drums.

As the story goes, David heard the song at Lisa’s house the night before playing the gig at Little Tree Arts Studios, and immediately envisioned the song’s harmonica part. 

“I love this track, dripping in swampy mojo vibes, full of the night, storms, and yearning ghosts,” David says.

The following afternoon, his harmonica was recorded in a single take at Electron Gardens Studio.

“There’s a call and response between the vocal and David’s harmonica,” King says. “In a way, they become the two characters in the song’s narrative.”

“Hell, Highwater, or Sunlight” is set to appear on an upcoming 10-song LP that’s being partially mixed by Ed Stasium, who has worked with everyone from the Ramones, the Pretenders, Talking Heads, and Mick Jagger to Atlanta’s new wave luminaries the Swimming Pool Q’s. 

Stasium mixed three of the album’s songs. The other seven, including “Hell, Highwater, or Sunlight” were mixed by Steven Morrison of Madlife Stage and Studio.

The album was trapped in limbo for more than a year-and-a-half, as no one could get into a studio to finish Schmid’s drum parts during the COVID-19 lockdown. Ultimately, the group wrapped up the single at West End Sound with Tom Tapley (Mastodon, West End Motel, Blackberry Smoke).

The title of the new album remains to be determined, but it’ set to arrive in 2022 via King’s self-run label No Big Wheel Records.

The Hot Place: Mike Lynn (from left), Lisa King, and Jeff Calder. Photo by Frank French.

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Didi Wray dances with a ghost in ‘Tango Halloween’

Didi Wray with El Chico.

Singer, composer, and tango music icon Carlos Gardel died in a tragic plane crash at the height of his career in the summer of 1935. 

To this day, however, there is a legend in the streets of Buenos Aires that Gardel’s ghost can still be seen and heard, dancing and singing at night, seducing women with his voice.

It’s a spectral tale that lies at the heart of Didi Wray’s latest offering, “Tango Halloween.”

The new song falls on the heels of her previous monthly single releases “One Step Beyond” (feat Señor Chancho), and her take on Bernard Herrmann’s theme from “The Twilight Zone.” It’s also the first song that she’s released under her name to bear her singing voice.

Those who are familiar with the Santiago, Chile-based surf rock guitarist’s work know of her other musical project, One Chica Gypsy Band, where her Spanish croon plays a prominent role. Never has it appeared throughout her surf rock recordings.

“This is something special for my fans,” she says. “As with many things I do in my career, I was motivated to sing for them. Some of my fans know my one-woman band and have asked several times that I sing a song in the Didi style — something in English. So there you have it.”

Wray handles everything from programming the drums to guiding the rhythms of her violín bass that she’s dubbed “El Chico.” And, of course, the atmosphere of her chilling guitar tones bring a thrilling, supernatural ambience to her surf-tango mission—haunted house horror with her signature flare for Latin rhythms and surfboard kerrang—produced by Francisco David, and mixed and mastered by Patricio Arias. Artwork is courtesy of Brazilian cartoonist Leandro Franco.

Keep an eye out for “Tango Halloween” to appear later this year on a new LP featuring 12 new numbers that she has in the works.

Until then, keep an eye out for Gardel in the streets. Trick-or-treat.

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Upchuck plays a 7-inch release show at Eyedrum Sat., Nov. 6

Upchuck. Photo by Marlon Garcia

Upchuck celebrates the arrival of the group’s debut 7-inch (Famous Class Records) with an outdoor show at Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery on Saturday, November 6.

Its About Time also performs.

An extremely limited quantity of Upchuck’s “In Your Mind” b/w “Upchuck” blood-spattered 7-inches will be for sale on the merch table—first come first served.

Doors open open at 7:30 p.m. Music starts at 8:30 p.m. $15-$20. Get tickets here.

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Claire Lodge & Tom Cheshire: A chance meeting in the produce department at Kroger on Buford Highway

Claire Lodge

I first heard about Claire Lodge on a Tom Waits message board about 10 years ago. Everyone was fascinated, but no one seemed to know much about her. Then somehow we linked up online through an old musician friend. For years we’ve shared ideas and filthy jokes and suggested books and music and films to watch, without ever meeting in person. That all ended last week, when I was at a grocery store on Buford Highway in Atlanta. 

We both tried to grab the same piece of fruit. She looked at me and said “You’re Tom Cheshire, I’m embarrassed I’m in my pajamas.” I responded saying “that’s OK I’m in my rain boots.” So there we were, finally face to face. We put our groceries in our cars and went and had a cup of coffee. 

Three hours later and a lot of laughs a real friendship was born. We managed to squeeze out an interview and we are talking about doing an EP. 

Here you go, I hope you enjoy.


Tom Cheshire: The first time I saw you live was in New York City, It was with Compartmentalizationalists. You had two drummers and a bassist.

Claire Lodge: Yeah, I co-write in that band. We have made three albums.

The Fainting Couch is your first solo album, do you approach your solo music differently?

With Comparts, most of the tunes have a set structure, even if we improvise within that structure. When I play solo, It’s almost all by feel. Some tunes will be two minutes one night, and eight the next. Life has enough structure, I like freedom. I like that in the artists I go see live too. If you are a rock band that plays everything the same way every time I see it, I get bored. I love people like PJ Harvey, Andrew Bird, Tom Waits. I like the element of surprise.

Did you set out to make it with just guitars? Did you try playing with a band first?

I set out to make it with just guitars. I love solo guitar albums. Bill Frisell’s In Line, Marc Ribot’s Saints, Masada Guitars, Sharrock’s Guitar, Etta Baker’s Railroad Bill, the list goes on. I like the intimacy of one person with one instrument.

The songs on the album have no titles. And it is an album, not a record. And where did the name come from?

They have titles. “Part 1,” “Part 2,” and so on. I want people to listen to the entire album, like you would watch a film. And no, no vinyl. They sell records at Target. So I hope I’m ahead of the curve on the comeback of CDs. As far as the title goes, I have always liked the words “Fainting Couch,” it sounds like it could mean several things.

Tom Cheshire: What is the first song you remember hearing?

Probably “Happy Birthday.” My parents didn’t listen to any vocal music growing up. I don’t remember hearing anyone sing until I was 10.

How old were you when you wrote your first song? What was it called? 

When I was 12 or 13 I got serious about guitar. I wrote a song called “Cincinnati String Bean.” It was a banger… I have never sung in my life. 

Where were you born? Where did you grow up and where is home now?

I was born in London. I have lived all over. Mainly London and Atlanta. I went to school at Stanford.

Have you ever stolen a car?

Never. I can barely drive.

What is the best cross country driving record?

Oh man, probably Francoise Hardy. Anything by her. Or Pink Flag on repeat.

Who is your biggest influence as a guitar player?

I heard the song “Apache” by the Shadows and wanted to learn it. While I was learning guitar we were living in Italy and my teacher introduced me to Tom Waits’ music and I fell in love with Marc Ribot’s playing. Then when I heard Sonny Sharrock my life was forever changed. I wish I had a cool story about discovering him, but it was on Space Ghost.


Who is your biggest influence as a piano player?

First off, I can barely play piano. But I like to listen to this dude Francois Couturier a lot. Nina Simone, Monk.

What is your favorite film score?

A Zed & Two Noughts by Michael Nyman. It is insane and perfect. In the past 20 years, I also really liked Johnny Greenwood’s The Master.

Do you see colors when you hear music? Do you see colors or visuals when you write music?

My images are almost always black and white.

How long should a film be? What is too long?

90 minutes if you have children. Up to 2.5 hours if not. I hope Bella Tarr doesn’t read this. 

What do you look for in a song?

Texture.

Your favorite city/country to perform in?

Poland. I have been going there for the past eight or nine years and it has been a blast. That’s what pushed me into recording my tunes.

Your favorite food on the road?

Red licorice.

Mexican vs Chinese. Your thoughts? That’s on food.

I hate goddamn cheese, so Chinese. Chinese food is awesome.

Go-to snack food?

Ice cream. Any kind, anywhere.

Guilty pleasure music?

I rarely feel guilty. I guess I will go with Poppy Family, Ace of Base. At this point… Nick Cave. 

Favorite member of Wu-Tang Clan?

Inspectah Deck. He is the man. He has the best verses and he needs the publicity.

Who is your favorite comedian?

Living or dead? George Carlin might be the best ever. But I love so many. Chris Rock, Chris Elliott, Norm Macdonald, Louie, Pryor … Why didn’t he make a record called Pryor Convictions? Wait, did he? 

Would you date a man who drives a Corvette?

Only if it was stolen. Jesus … I sound like Lana Del Rey.


Who would you like to work with, write with? Dream collaboration?

Chris Gaines. We could talk shit about Garth Brooks. I bet he sniffs glue. I should go easy on him. He survived tragedies. 

But really, Tom Cheshire. Let’s make that happen.

Please say me, and do you want to put out a record together? If so, let’s do this.

Oh… I didn’t even read ahead. Yes! Let’s do eet. 

Will we get a Claire Lodge U.S. tour soon?

I don’t think so. I play secret shows in Atlanta and New York a few times a year, but can’t hit the road anymore. 

Last but not least, your thoughts on sandals? I personally can’t stand them.

Is Sandals a show on CBS? It should be.

Thank you so much for your time, Claire. 

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The Creature Preachers: ‘A Night to Dismember’

Scary Gary (left) and Greg Regular of the Creature Preachers.


The Creature Preachers from Warner Robins, GA return from the depths of the Southern abyss with a new single, titled “A Night to Dismember.”

Greg Regular (drums, bass, guitar) and Scary Gary (guitar, bass, drums) embrace the spirit of Halloween with a menacing yet melancholy dose of surf rock and horror punk ambiance, blending yearning and mystical imagery with moonlight and the macabre.

“A Night to Dismember” strikes a haunting balance of ‘50s horror movie scores and the melancholy vibe of the Misfits’ “Hybrid Moments”—with a clear inclination for all things the Cramps, the Pixies, CCR, B-52’s, and The Ghastly Ones. It’s an instrumental number, but the organ, guitar, and rhythmic traipse tell a story for the mind’s eye to behold.

“It definitely tells a story which is what you always want in a song, especially with an instrumental,” Greg says. “That’s never easy because there aren’t any lyrics to tell the story for you. We didn’t start out with any particular ideas in mind when we wrote the song. It just kind of wrote its own story. All we had to do was move out of the way and let the song do it’s thing.”

That thing is an equally nuanced and anthemic hellride to the wicked fringes of the darkside.

It’s shaping up to be a busy year for the Creature Preachers. The group will be appearing on a few different Halloween compilations this month. There’s also a split 7-inch with their Altered State Of Reverb label mates the Mysterics. There’s another 7-inch and an appearance on a Planet Of The Apes-themed comp. for Missing Fink Records. There’s also an appearance on an Otitis Media Records comp. After that, they’ll start work on their debut full-length album for next year.

The group also has an appearance slated for the Inuhele Tiki Weekend coming up at the Sheraton Hotel Jan. 28-30, 2022.

In the meantime, press play and sink into the Creature Preachers’ ghoulish sonata.

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Three on the Ones and Twos ep. 16: Bauhaus: ‘Burning From the Inside’

Burning From the Inside has always held something of a mystery simmering just beneath the surface of every note and every lyrical phrase. Bauhaus’ final album (the first time around) perfectly distilled the band’s black-clad post-punk and proto-goth traipse into an enigmatic final act. Like the arrows of chaos, seminal recordings by Love and Rockets, Peter Murphy, Tones On Tail, David J, Daniel Ash, Dali’s Car, and Poptone all fired off in every direction shortly after its arrival.

I’m not sure if there’s a literal code to crack here, but nods to Italian Futurism in “Who Killed Mr. Moonlight” take shape as a poignant snapshot of a group that has already pulled itself apart at the seams. “Antonin Artaud” pushes that tension to an ecstatic state, “King Volcano,” “Slice Of Life,” and the album’s title track are monster cuts—quintessential Bauhaus. “Hope” brings it all to a warm and psychedelic landing, hinting at what the future holds in store. But it’s difficult to see the forest for the trees, maybe that’s what the cover art is all about. All meaning is shrouded in layers upon layers of cinematic imagery here. Nearly 40 years after its arrival, Burning From the Inside still reveals all sorts of insight into the band’s history and legacy. I was thrilled when Cassy, Tom, and James invited me on the show to talk about it all.

You can also listen to our conversation on Spotify.

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Circle Jerks, 7 Seconds, and Negative Approach play the Masquerade April 22

Circle Jerks photo by Atiba Jefferson


Circle Jerks are on the road again, celebrating the 40th anniversary of their 1980 debut album Group Sex, recently reissued by Trust Records.

The show also marks the group’s first show in Atlanta since they played the Masquerade in December of 2006. Were you at that show?

For this tour, drummer Joey Castillo (Danzig, QOTSA, BL’AST!, the Bronx, and more) fills out the lineup.

Trust Records also recently reissued 7 Seconds’ 1984 debut LP, The Crew. Both 7 Seconds and Negative Approach (!!!) fill out the bill for what’s sure to be a total blast of a show.

Friday, April 22 at the Masquerade (Heaven). $32.50 (adv). 7 p.m. (doors).

Photo courtesy 7 Seconds


Negative Approach photo by Chad Radford


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